The New Yorker , John Updike ,and Luning Bonifacio Ira

For three decades I   saw the latest subscription of The New Yorker Magazine lying at around our home in Quezon City. In the late 1960s, I recall  I loved looking and reading the funny pages.  There’s a  certain sweet sophistication of wit, humor, and fun drawn by visiting cartoon artists that will attract a reader.

 Somehow, I was not surprised when I read an article about a well know a writer who had a similar experience when he was a child. This was way back in the late nineteen twenties, his name – John Updike (1932 – Jan 2009).

giphy (4)

The New Yorker is an American Magazine. It has been around for almost 93 years. It’s first publication started out in February 1925.

This was founded by Harold Wallace Ross and his wife,   Jeanette Cole Grant. The New Yorker is an American Magazine full of fabulous writers and stores a variety of smart and witty literary content coming out from sources such as : Literary reviews, commentaries, essays, poetry, cartoons, humor, interviews, and satire.

The New Yorker Reviews and Events mainly focus mostly on the cultural life of New York City.

I encourage you to visit and check out and subscribe to The New Yorker at Amazon. You will be surprised by the roster of well-known writers.

(Excerpt)giphy (5)

In subsequent decades the magazine published short stories by many of the most respected writers of the 20th and 21st centuries, including Ann Beattie, Truman Capote, John Cheever, Roald Dahl, Mavis Gallant, Geoffrey Hellman, John McNulty, Joseph Mitchell, Alice Munro, Haruki Murakami, Vladimir Nabokov, John O’Hara, Dorothy Parker, Philip Roth, J. D. Salinger, Irwin Shaw, James Thurber, John Updike, Eudora Welty, Stephen King, and E. B. White. Publication of Shirley Jackson‘s “The Lottery” drew more mail than any other story in the magazine’s history.

– the wikipedia

I  inherited the Amazon Keyboard Kindle from my mother. It is protected by a hardcover which featured the front cover of the New Yorker magazine dated July,15,1991.

I even retained a couple of back issues of the New Yorker  from May 30,2011 to April 2, 2012.

My purpose is to read her favorite articles when I   visit her. She is now eighty-eight years old.

Last weekend, while vacationing in Zambales I read a kindle ebook  about “Tea for Two-An Interview with John Updike” by Simon Werrell.  I was utterly surprised how John Updike originally planned to to work out as a professional cartoon artists. But instead chose to create and write awesome short stories, such as The Witches of Eastweek, The Maples Stories just to name a few.

Check out the Ten  Best John Updike Books.

17505347_1602171879812994_6536615885009463871_o

The Connection 

Luning Bonifacio Ira is the author of  “The Streets of Manila (1977)”, “Guide to Filipino Wedding(1990) “, “Manila Polo Club:Seventy Five Years(1981) ” , “Philippine Beer:It’ Life and Times (1981) and a two time Palanca Awardee for Short Stories in the English Categories . This is similar to the Pulitzer Award for English Short Stories.

I would like to thank  Kanlaon who wrote  “The Joy of Reading Luning Bonifacio Ira “Here is an excerpt of “Tell Me Who Cleft the Devil’s Foot”

Rounding Luneta’s manicured acres, she turned right at Del Pilar, left at Padre Faura, and right at a side street whose new name she could not recall.  She felt at home in this part of town.  South Manila was was where an ambience was compounded of old acacia trees which shed their leaves gently like confetti, breezes that might carry the tang of salt (for, south, the sea was never far away), and a tranquil quality which went by the name of “Before the War.”  She parked her car in the shade of an acacia which trailed lush green fern plants, for sale by sidewalk vendors parked there day after day.

Dr. Twig’s clinic was in the back portion of a hotel which had bloomed before the advent of tourism and was now shrunken in the shadow of the skyscraping internationals.

“Dr. Twig will see you in a little while.  Please be seated,” said the mini-skirted young receptionist.  She looked fifteen, though of course she couldn’t be.  Filipino girls just looked younger than their age.

Dr. Twig’s equipment had always impressed her, even aroused a proprietary feeling due partly, she supposed, to all the past bills she’d been paying.

Her last visit had been when she’d had reading glasses fitted two years ago.  But when Dr. Twig came in, lean, stooped and shiny-domed, she was not prepared to find him so aged.

My weekend in Zambales  inspired me.I believe this is how the past  bridges  the present mind,influences and connect to the  present and current generation . Finally  leaves an imprint of   golden literary treasure  for future readers to savor on.

200w_d (5)

Advertisements

One thought on “The New Yorker , John Updike ,and Luning Bonifacio Ira

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s